Difference between revisions of "Civil Rights"

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==Nazism and Fascism, Left-Wing Concepts==
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==History==
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===Christian Origins of U.S. Abolition===
 +
 
 +
The early opponents of slavery in the Americas were not liberals but Christian conservatives. Roger Williams established the openly Christian province of Rhode Island in 1641, whose 1663 charter advocated adherence to "gospel principles... in the true Christian faith and worship of God" as well as the first anti-slavery group in the U.S.
 +
 
 +
===Nazism and Fascism, Left-Wing Concepts===
  
 
Despite the attempts of liberals in academia to portray Nazism and Fascism as right-wing, in reality they always were left-wing in origin. The German word for Nazi is ''Nationalsozialismus'' which literally translates as National Socialist Party.<ref>"[https://www.britannica.com/event/National-Socialism Nazism]." Encyclopaedia Britannica.</ref> The Nazi platform included nationalized healthcare, retirement, and education even as they opposed capitalism. Scientists like Josef Mengele practiced the Nazi doctrine of Social Darwinism in committing heinous war crimes. The Nazis, like other Socialist and Communist nations, opposed religious freedom and Christianity. The leader of the Confessing Church, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, was arrested and executed, 800 German Protestant pastors were arrested and sent to concentration camps, and 400 Catholic priests were similarly sent to concentration camps.<ref>“[http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/tch_wjec/germany19291947/2racialreligiouspolicy2.shtml Twentieth Century History: Germany in Transition, c. 1929-1947, Changing Life for the German People.]" BBC GGSE Bitesize.</ref>  
 
Despite the attempts of liberals in academia to portray Nazism and Fascism as right-wing, in reality they always were left-wing in origin. The German word for Nazi is ''Nationalsozialismus'' which literally translates as National Socialist Party.<ref>"[https://www.britannica.com/event/National-Socialism Nazism]." Encyclopaedia Britannica.</ref> The Nazi platform included nationalized healthcare, retirement, and education even as they opposed capitalism. Scientists like Josef Mengele practiced the Nazi doctrine of Social Darwinism in committing heinous war crimes. The Nazis, like other Socialist and Communist nations, opposed religious freedom and Christianity. The leader of the Confessing Church, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, was arrested and executed, 800 German Protestant pastors were arrested and sent to concentration camps, and 400 Catholic priests were similarly sent to concentration camps.<ref>“[http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/tch_wjec/germany19291947/2racialreligiouspolicy2.shtml Twentieth Century History: Germany in Transition, c. 1929-1947, Changing Life for the German People.]" BBC GGSE Bitesize.</ref>  
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And Mussolini's Fascists? Benito Mussolini started out as a publisher of several Socialist newspapers like Avante! (Forward) and L’Avvenire del Lavoratore (The Worker’s Future).<ref>“[https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/mussolini-founds-the-fascist-party This Day in History: March 23rd, 1919 – Mussolini Founds the Fascist Party.]” History Channel.</ref> Mussolini was an atheist who praised Karl Marx.<ref>Greenspan, J. (2012). “[https://www.history.com/news/9-things-you-may-not-know-about-mussolini 9 Things You May Not Know About Mussolini.]” History Channel.</ref> Even in his later years Mussolini continued advocating Socialism and claimed that he had attempted to nationalize property but had to delay doing so for wartime purposes.<ref>Smith, Denis M. (1983). “[https://books.google.com/books?id=r9eXPwAACAAJ Mussolini: A Biography.]” p. 311. New York Vintage Books.</ref>
 
And Mussolini's Fascists? Benito Mussolini started out as a publisher of several Socialist newspapers like Avante! (Forward) and L’Avvenire del Lavoratore (The Worker’s Future).<ref>“[https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/mussolini-founds-the-fascist-party This Day in History: March 23rd, 1919 – Mussolini Founds the Fascist Party.]” History Channel.</ref> Mussolini was an atheist who praised Karl Marx.<ref>Greenspan, J. (2012). “[https://www.history.com/news/9-things-you-may-not-know-about-mussolini 9 Things You May Not Know About Mussolini.]” History Channel.</ref> Even in his later years Mussolini continued advocating Socialism and claimed that he had attempted to nationalize property but had to delay doing so for wartime purposes.<ref>Smith, Denis M. (1983). “[https://books.google.com/books?id=r9eXPwAACAAJ Mussolini: A Biography.]” p. 311. New York Vintage Books.</ref>
  
==Eisenhower's Role==
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===Eisenhower's Role===
  
 
Republican President Dwight Eisenhower, perhaps more than anyone else except Martin Luther King Jr., was strongly responsible for sparking the 1960s Civil Rights revolution. Eisenhower as early as 1945 desegregated the armed forces while a five-star general in World War II's Battle of the Bulge. Not content to stop there, Eisenhower then as President desegregated schools, sending in the National Guard to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education.''<ref>American Experience (n.d.). “[http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/general-article/eisenhower-domestic/ Eisenhower.]” PBS.<br>Andrews, E. (2014, December 16). “[http://www.history.com/news/8-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-battle-of-the-bulge 8 Things You May Not Know About the Battle of the Bulge.]” History Channel.</ref> Eisenhower then urged Congress to pass the first major civil rights legislation in decades, the 1957 Civil Rights Act, which was originally proposed by his Republican Attorney General Herbert Brownell. Lyndon B. Johnson, a renowned racist who boasted of opposing anti-lynching legislation,<ref>The Relentless Conservative (2011, August 24). “[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-relentless-conservative/the-democratic-partys-two_b_933995.html The Democratic Party’s Two-Facedness of Race Relations.]” Huffington Post.</ref> would ultimately take credit for Eisenhower's reforms, even though Johnson weakened the reforms that Eisenhower sought.<ref>Nichols, David A (2007, September 12). “[http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/12/opinion/12nichols.html Ike Liked Civil Rights.]” New York Times.</ref>
 
Republican President Dwight Eisenhower, perhaps more than anyone else except Martin Luther King Jr., was strongly responsible for sparking the 1960s Civil Rights revolution. Eisenhower as early as 1945 desegregated the armed forces while a five-star general in World War II's Battle of the Bulge. Not content to stop there, Eisenhower then as President desegregated schools, sending in the National Guard to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education.''<ref>American Experience (n.d.). “[http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/general-article/eisenhower-domestic/ Eisenhower.]” PBS.<br>Andrews, E. (2014, December 16). “[http://www.history.com/news/8-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-battle-of-the-bulge 8 Things You May Not Know About the Battle of the Bulge.]” History Channel.</ref> Eisenhower then urged Congress to pass the first major civil rights legislation in decades, the 1957 Civil Rights Act, which was originally proposed by his Republican Attorney General Herbert Brownell. Lyndon B. Johnson, a renowned racist who boasted of opposing anti-lynching legislation,<ref>The Relentless Conservative (2011, August 24). “[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-relentless-conservative/the-democratic-partys-two_b_933995.html The Democratic Party’s Two-Facedness of Race Relations.]” Huffington Post.</ref> would ultimately take credit for Eisenhower's reforms, even though Johnson weakened the reforms that Eisenhower sought.<ref>Nichols, David A (2007, September 12). “[http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/12/opinion/12nichols.html Ike Liked Civil Rights.]” New York Times.</ref>
  
==Southern Strategy==
+
===Southern Strategy===
  
 
I am reserving a broader discussion of "Southern Strategy" for my book. My arguments against the parties switching sides will be detailed there. Needless to say though, Democrats remain the same party of socialism they were in 1935 when they created Social Security and in 1965 when they created Medicare. For just a few examples of the Democrats' link to their racist past, see Al Gore Jr., whose father Al Gore Sr. voted as a U.S. Senator against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Bill Clinton's mentor James William Fulbright, another Senator to vote against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and of course, Hillary Clinton's mentor Robert Byrd, a former Ku Klux Klan leader and yet another U.S. Senator who not only opposed the 1964 Civil Rights Act but delivered a record-breaking 14 hour and 13 minute speech attempting to filibuster the Civil Rights Act to stop its passage.
 
I am reserving a broader discussion of "Southern Strategy" for my book. My arguments against the parties switching sides will be detailed there. Needless to say though, Democrats remain the same party of socialism they were in 1935 when they created Social Security and in 1965 when they created Medicare. For just a few examples of the Democrats' link to their racist past, see Al Gore Jr., whose father Al Gore Sr. voted as a U.S. Senator against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Bill Clinton's mentor James William Fulbright, another Senator to vote against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and of course, Hillary Clinton's mentor Robert Byrd, a former Ku Klux Klan leader and yet another U.S. Senator who not only opposed the 1964 Civil Rights Act but delivered a record-breaking 14 hour and 13 minute speech attempting to filibuster the Civil Rights Act to stop its passage.

Revision as of 14:32, 10 November 2018

Republicans consistently voted in higher percentages for civil rights bills from the 1860s to the 1960s.[1] The following is a history of civil rights legislation showing how both parties have voted.

Civil Rights Legislation

Year Legislation Republicans Democrats
House Senate Percent House Senate Percent
1865 13th Amendment[2] 86/86 34/34 100% 14/63 3/9 24%
1866 Civil Rights Act[3] 118/120 32/36 96% 0/33 0/11 0%
1866 14th Amendment[4] 128/128 32/35 98% 0/37 0/8 0%
1870 15th Amendment[5] 142/146 39/43 96% 0/39 0/9 0%
1870 Enforcement Act[6] 132/133 48/49 99% 0/54 0/10 0%
1871 Enforcement Act[7] 93/94 36/38 98% 0/73 0/11 0%
1875 Civil Rights Act[8] 162/177 38/45 90% 0/85 0/18 0%
1919 19th Amendment[9] 200/219 36/44 90% 102/172 20/37 58%
1924 Indian Citizenship Act Unrecorded, passed by GOP President/Congress
1957 Civil Rights Act[10] 167/186 43/43 92% 118/225 29/47 54%
1960 Civil Rights Act[11] 123/135 29/29 93% 165/248 42/60 67%
1963 Equal Pay Act[12] 160/160 34/34 100% 201/210 65/65 96%
1964 Civil Rights Act[13] 136/171 27/34 80% 152/243 46/66 64%
1965 Voting Rights Act[14] 109/129 30/31 87% 218/272 49/65 79%
1965 Immigration and Nationality Act[15] 117/127 24/27 92% 202/262 52/66 77%
1991 Civil Rights Act[16] 128/161 38/43 81% 252/257 55/55 98%
1996 Adoption Promotion and Stability Act[17] 219/220 - 100% 170/184 - 92%
1998 International Religious Freedom Act[18] 206/220 55/55 95% 167/195 43/43 88%
2002 Born-Alive Infants Protection Act[19] 200/220 47/49 92% 179/210 50/50 88%
2003 Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act[20] 218/229 47/51 95% 63/205 17/48 32%

History

Christian Origins of U.S. Abolition

The early opponents of slavery in the Americas were not liberals but Christian conservatives. Roger Williams established the openly Christian province of Rhode Island in 1641, whose 1663 charter advocated adherence to "gospel principles... in the true Christian faith and worship of God" as well as the first anti-slavery group in the U.S.

Nazism and Fascism, Left-Wing Concepts

Despite the attempts of liberals in academia to portray Nazism and Fascism as right-wing, in reality they always were left-wing in origin. The German word for Nazi is Nationalsozialismus which literally translates as National Socialist Party.[21] The Nazi platform included nationalized healthcare, retirement, and education even as they opposed capitalism. Scientists like Josef Mengele practiced the Nazi doctrine of Social Darwinism in committing heinous war crimes. The Nazis, like other Socialist and Communist nations, opposed religious freedom and Christianity. The leader of the Confessing Church, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, was arrested and executed, 800 German Protestant pastors were arrested and sent to concentration camps, and 400 Catholic priests were similarly sent to concentration camps.[22]

And Mussolini's Fascists? Benito Mussolini started out as a publisher of several Socialist newspapers like Avante! (Forward) and L’Avvenire del Lavoratore (The Worker’s Future).[23] Mussolini was an atheist who praised Karl Marx.[24] Even in his later years Mussolini continued advocating Socialism and claimed that he had attempted to nationalize property but had to delay doing so for wartime purposes.[25]

Eisenhower's Role

Republican President Dwight Eisenhower, perhaps more than anyone else except Martin Luther King Jr., was strongly responsible for sparking the 1960s Civil Rights revolution. Eisenhower as early as 1945 desegregated the armed forces while a five-star general in World War II's Battle of the Bulge. Not content to stop there, Eisenhower then as President desegregated schools, sending in the National Guard to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling in Brown v. Board of Education.[26] Eisenhower then urged Congress to pass the first major civil rights legislation in decades, the 1957 Civil Rights Act, which was originally proposed by his Republican Attorney General Herbert Brownell. Lyndon B. Johnson, a renowned racist who boasted of opposing anti-lynching legislation,[27] would ultimately take credit for Eisenhower's reforms, even though Johnson weakened the reforms that Eisenhower sought.[28]

Southern Strategy

I am reserving a broader discussion of "Southern Strategy" for my book. My arguments against the parties switching sides will be detailed there. Needless to say though, Democrats remain the same party of socialism they were in 1935 when they created Social Security and in 1965 when they created Medicare. For just a few examples of the Democrats' link to their racist past, see Al Gore Jr., whose father Al Gore Sr. voted as a U.S. Senator against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Bill Clinton's mentor James William Fulbright, another Senator to vote against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and of course, Hillary Clinton's mentor Robert Byrd, a former Ku Klux Klan leader and yet another U.S. Senator who not only opposed the 1964 Civil Rights Act but delivered a record-breaking 14 hour and 13 minute speech attempting to filibuster the Civil Rights Act to stop its passage.

Sources

  1. Parks, B. The Democrat Race Lie. www.Black-and-Right.com.
    Williamson, K.D. (2012, May 21). The Party of Civil Rights. The National Review.
  2. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1865, January 31). To Pass S.J. Res. 16. (P. 531-2) GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1864, April 8). To Pass S.J. Res. 16. GovTrack.us.
  3. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1866, April 9). To Override Veto of S. 61. (P. 1861). GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1866, April 6). To Override President's Veto of S. 61. (P. 1809-3). GovTrack.us.
  4. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1866, June 13). To Concur in a Senate Amendment to H. J. Res. 127. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1866, June 8). To Pass H.J. Res. 127. (P. 3042-2). GovTrack.us.
  5. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1869, February 25). To Agree to the Conference Committee Report on S.J. Res. 8. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1869, February 26). To Agree to Conference Committee Report on S.J. Res. 8, Proposing an Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. (P. 1638-2) GovTrack.us.
  6. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1870, May 27). To Agree to the Conference Report on H.R. 1293, a Bill to Enforce the Right of Citizens to Vote. (P. 3853-3) GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1870, May 25). To Agree to the Conference Report on H.R. 1293. (P. 3800, 3809) GovTrack.us.
  7. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1871, April 19). To Adopt Conference Report on H.R. 320. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1871, April 19). To Concur in Conference Report on H.R. 320. GovTrack.us.
  8. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1875, February 4). To Pass H.R. 796. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1875, February 4). To Pass H.R. 796. GovTrack.us.
  9. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1919, May 21). To Pass H.J. Res. 1, Proposing an Amendment to the Constitution Extending the Right of Suffrage to Women. (P. 78-2). GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1919, June 1). To Pass HJR 1. GovTrack.us.
  10. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1957, June 18). HR 6127, Civil Rights Act of 1957, Passed. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1957, August 7). HR. 6127, Civil Rights Act of 1957, Passed. GovTrack.us.
  11. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1960, April 21). HR 8601, Civil Rights Act of 1960, Approval by the House of the Senate's Amendments. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1960, April 8). HR. 8601, Passage of Amended Bill. GovTrack.us.
  12. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1963, May 23). H.R. 6060, Equal Pay Act Requiring that Equal Work be Compensated with Equal Pay Regardless of the Sex of the Workers. GovTrack.us.
    Equal Pay Act for Women Enacted. CQ Almanac 1963, 19th ed.(pp. 511-13).
  13. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1964, July 2). H.R. 7152, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Adoption of a Resolution (H. Res. 789) Providing for House Approval of the Bill as Amended by the Senate. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1964, June 19). H.R. 7152, Passage. GovTrack.us.
  14. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1965, August 3). To Agree to Conference Report on S. 1564, the Voting Rights Act. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1965, August 4). To Agree to the Conference Report on S. 1564, the Voting Rights Act of 1965. GovTrack.us.
  15. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1965, September 30). To Agree to the Conference Report on H.R. 2580, the Immigration and Nationality Act. GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1965, September 22). To Pass H.R. 2580, Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments. GovTrack.us.
  16. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1991, November 7). S. 1745 (102nd): Civil Rights Act of 1991 (On Passage of the Bill). GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1991, October 30). S. 1745 (102nd): Civil Rights Act of 1991 (On Passage of the Bill). GovTrack.us.
  17. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1996, May 10). H.R. 3286 (104th): Adoption Promotion and Stability Act of 1996 (On Passage of the Bill). GovTrack.us.
  18. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1998, May 14). H.R. 2431 (105th): International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (On Passage of the Bill). GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (1998, October 9). H.R. 2431 (105th): International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (On Passage of the Bill). GovTrack.us.
  19. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (2000, September 26). H.R. 4292 (106th): Born-Alive Infants Protection Act of 2000 (On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass, as Amended). GovTrack.us.
    On the Amendment (Santorum Amdt. No. 814) (2001, June 29). United States Senate.
  20. Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (2003, October 2). S. 3 (108th): Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 (On the Conference Report). GovTrack.us.
    Tauberer, J., & Poole, K. (2003, October 21). S. 3 (108th): Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 (On the Conference Report). GovTrack.us.
  21. "Nazism." Encyclopaedia Britannica.
  22. Twentieth Century History: Germany in Transition, c. 1929-1947, Changing Life for the German People." BBC GGSE Bitesize.
  23. This Day in History: March 23rd, 1919 – Mussolini Founds the Fascist Party.” History Channel.
  24. Greenspan, J. (2012). “9 Things You May Not Know About Mussolini.” History Channel.
  25. Smith, Denis M. (1983). “Mussolini: A Biography.” p. 311. New York Vintage Books.
  26. American Experience (n.d.). “Eisenhower.” PBS.
    Andrews, E. (2014, December 16). “8 Things You May Not Know About the Battle of the Bulge.” History Channel.
  27. The Relentless Conservative (2011, August 24). “The Democratic Party’s Two-Facedness of Race Relations.” Huffington Post.
  28. Nichols, David A (2007, September 12). “Ike Liked Civil Rights.” New York Times.